• Gear
  • Shots
  • Photo Craft
  • Video
  • Wide Angle
  • Support
  • New Stuff
  • More
Gear Cameras D800 vs D800E

Need some help with your New SmugMug Site?

Dgrin Challenges

They're back! Our latest series of Dgrin Challenges, the OOYCZ Challenges (Out of Your Comfort Zone), is a series of challenges to help you improve your photography by stepping out of your comfort zone and trying something new. Our challenge leader says "Consider it like a photography class with no diplomas.". Get started with OOYCZ by reading the Challenge Guide.

Past DSS Challenge Winners, DSS Challenge Rules, and other important DSS Challenge information is here.

Looking for a little challenge? The Dgrin Mini-Challenges are a great way to challenge yourself. Take a moment to look through past winners and find the current Mini Challenge here.

From Around the Net

Enjoy a few of our favorite articles from around the 'net. If you have something you think we should see, post it here and we'll have a look.

Journeys

Landscapes

Sports

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Page 4  of  5
1 2 3 4 5
Old Feb-19-2012, 06:48 AM
#61
Wayupthere is offline Wayupthere
Former SemiPro Noob
Wayupthere's Avatar
In this issue of Amateur Photographer, they interview Nobuaki Sasagaki who said as long as there is demand they would continue to produce and sell the 700.
http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk...5.html?aff=rss
Gary

Also great info and interviews about the Olympus scandal that I have not finished reading
Old Feb-19-2012, 08:02 AM
#62
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarnsworthPhotography View Post
Here is a hands-on review I found online covering both cameras
http://www.ephotozine.com/article/ni...n-review-18420

This one has some photos of the inside workings and how it's laid out.
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PROD...ikon-d800A.HTM
Thanks. Good reading.
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Old Feb-22-2012, 12:08 AM
#63
ajana is offline ajana
Beginner grinner
moire pattern removed
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icebear View Post
And if you've never run into ugly moire in your real world, have a look at the chair across the table. Fix that in post. I couldn't.



Edit: Sorry. For some reason there's no Exif in the image. Anyway, this was shot about six years ago with a D70.
I have removed the moire pattern in 3 mins
Attached Images
 
Old Feb-22-2012, 04:03 AM
#64
Icebear is offline Icebear
Major grins
Icebear's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajana View Post
I have removed the moire pattern in 3 mins
Pretty good! I think people would like to know how you accomplished that. Would your technique hold up if this old image were printed at, say, 8x10. I sure don't think I could have done what you did six years ago. Not in three minutes, for sure. I remember trying and not being at all happy with my results.
__________________
John :
Natural selection is responsible for every living thing that exists.
D3s, D700, D300, D7100 Way more glass than the wife knows about, LR5, PS CC
Old Feb-22-2012, 04:45 AM
#65
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by fldspringer View Post
Ok, you've rented the D3s and your looking for a sports camera in the form of the D800? There is little doubt that the D4 will trump the D3s, but the D3s will maintain frame rate, give the ISO range you need, 300k shutter life, hellish battery life, AF performance only bested by the D4 (and possibly the D800 series).

I don't know what the D3s will sell for when the D4 ships, but I think is gives all your looking for and is a known performer. I know its good enough I'm staying with it in spite of the new toys hitting the market.
It has all I'm looking for except enough pixels, 3d face-tracking auto-focus, and a discrete appearance. I have ruled it out (after using it for more than one event). Every camera has compromises - I'm just sifting through which characteristics are most important to me. Frames per second are not important to me (though I might find 15 or 20 useful - I don't know because I've never had that). 12MP is not enough for me (36 is certainly more than I would have requested).

Quote:
Originally Posted by fldspringer View Post
I just have a feeling the no-filter version will be a specialty camera in the end.
You may well be right. Thanks for the thoughts.
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Old Feb-22-2012, 04:49 AM
#66
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajana View Post
I have removed the moire pattern in 3 mins
Impressive! Nice, clean, and convincing - at least as sized currently. I'm sure we would all like to hear how you did that so quickly.
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Old Feb-22-2012, 06:09 AM
#67
ajana is offline ajana
Beginner grinner
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Bombadil View Post
Impressive! Nice, clean, and convincing - at least as sized currently. I'm sure we would all like to hear how you did that so quickly.
I used Lightroom 4 & photoshop to do this. Here are the steps :

1. The new Light Room 4 has the option to remove color moire under adjustment brush. I used that to take off the color. Just brush the section and slide the slider. This is really a simple task and anyone with basic or no knowledge could do it. Nikon is also going to include in NX bundled with D800E, so in case you dont have LR4 you could do that in NX also.

2. Then opened the image in Photoshop to remove the dark pattern. I applied a blur filter with 2 pixel radius & 15 threshold to the selected section only to smooth out the details. Since the Image was very small I had to apply 2 pixel radius but for D800E 1 pixel should be enough. I also recommend to upscale the image for D800E then apply the blur filter then down sample the image. This will make the pixel size smaller when applying the blur filter.

Hope this helps. I am also doing lot of research on D800E and looks like 36MP will automatically reduce moire effect and stepping down the f to f/11 will cause diffraction which will also reduce the moire effect. On top of this we have options to remove it in post processing.
Old Feb-22-2012, 06:16 AM
#68
perroneford is offline perroneford
Major grins
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajana View Post
Hope this helps. I am also doing lot of research on D800E and looks like 36MP will automatically reduce moire effect and stepping down the f to f/11 will cause diffraction which will also reduce the moire effect. On top of this we have options to remove it in post processing.
All true. But when I do a fashion shoot and run off 500-1000 images, I'd rather not spend half a day finding the ones with Moire, and then trying to fix them. All while working on a deadline.

While you might have more time to work on something once the finals are selected, I would not want to have client review on set, or post-shoot and have 3 or 4 dozen show up with Moire. I had to go through this recently with my D7000 on a shoot for a client, and it was NOT fun.
Old Feb-22-2012, 11:17 AM
#69
FearNothing321 is offline FearNothing321
Major grins
High ISO Examples from the D800 compared to the D700

http://nikonrumors.com/2012/02/22/ni...mparison.aspx/
__________________
Nikon D800, Pentax K1000

You don't take a photograph, you make it. ~Ansel Adams

Blue Moon Originals
Old Feb-22-2012, 01:28 PM
#70
ThatCanonGuy is offline ThatCanonGuy
Loves Photography
ThatCanonGuy's Avatar
If you stop down to where diffraction sets in, that kind of takes away the E's sharpness advantage.

Those high ISO samples are amazing. I think it may be Nikon's turn to take sales away from the 5DIII.
Old Feb-22-2012, 03:46 PM
#71
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by FearNothing321 View Post
High ISO Examples from the D800 compared to the D700

http://nikonrumors.com/2012/02/22/ni...mparison.aspx/
Appreciate you pointing these out. I wonder though . . . don't they seem a little suspect?

I would have thought that "100%" crops from D700 and D800 would show quite different field of view (100% means 1:1 image pixel to screen pixel, yes? or maybe i just don't know what's what.)
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Old Feb-25-2012, 11:04 AM
#72
Robin Casady is offline Robin Casady
Big grins
Some thoughts on D800 vs. D800E:

I've pre-ordered the D800E, but my love is landscapes and macros. I rarely shoot people. If I were primarily shooting sports, people, or urban settings I would choose the D800.

Someone came up with a good statement about the choice. If you have to ask, you are probably better off with the D800.

I've tried a few moiré reduction techniques on sample images posted on the web. Most were from a D70 or a Lieca. None could be completely fixed. The techniques I used were the Lightroom 4 beta adjustment brush, and methods described on these links:

Removing Moiré Effectively

A New Way to Remove Moire

Moiré Removal in Photoshop

Because of the higher MP count, the D800E should have less incidence of moiré than the Leica. However, when it shows up, the fixed area will be of lower quality than it would be than an D800 image—assuming the moiré did not show up in the D800 image. There is no guarantee that the D800 will be moiré free.

Regarding sharpening an D800 image to match an D800E image, I doubt it can be done. How subtle the difference will be is difficult to evaluate with so few sample images available.

I think Nikon would not have bothered making two models if there weren't valid reasons for each. If moiré were extremely rare, or you could completely repair it with ease, there would be no point in making an D800. On the other hand, the only reason to make the D800E is because it must produce a level of image quality that the D800 cannot match.

The linear resolution of the D800/E is only a 70% increase over the D700. A 300 dpi print from a D800 would be about 16x24". If I wasn't interested in printing large, I would stick with the D700.
__________________
Robin Casady
http://www.robincasady.com/Photo/index.html
Old Feb-25-2012, 03:18 PM
#73
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajana View Post
Hope this helps. I am also doing lot of research on D800E and looks like 36MP will automatically reduce moire effect and stepping down the f to f/11 will cause diffraction which will also reduce the moire effect. On top of this we have options to remove it in post processing.
It does help. Thanks for the explanation.
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Old Feb-25-2012, 03:34 PM
#74
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Casady View Post
Someone came up with a good statement about the choice. If you have to ask, you are probably better off with the D800.
I understand the notion that "if you have to ask . . . " (and have also seen it mentioned on various discussion threads). The problem with that line of thinking is that it is dismissive of the photographer who wants to learn about the differences and grow in their picture making (perhaps in a direction favored by the 800E). It pre-supposes a lot about the buyer. So, while I'm not criticizing you for using that phrase, I have to say that it is not relevant to my search.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Casady View Post
I've tried a few moiré reduction techniques on sample images posted on the web. Most were from a D70 or a Lieca. None could be completely fixed. The techniques I used were the Lightroom 4 beta adjustment brush, and methods described on these links:
Was that a modified D70, or did you experience moire with a stock D70?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Casady View Post
I think Nikon would not have bothered making two models if there weren't valid reasons for each. If moiré were extremely rare, or you could completely repair it with ease, there would be no point in making an D800. On the other hand, the only reason to make the D800E is because it must produce a level of image quality that the D800 cannot match.
Agreed. There must be some difference - so someone who will only own one has a decision to make. The D800 is an easy answer, as it (presumably) will exhibit moire approx. as often as other Nikons with AA filtering. The buyer who would sometimes like the 800E has to decide whether to risk the moire hassle.

Thank you for your thoughts and the helpful links.
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Old Feb-25-2012, 08:07 PM
#75
Matthew Saville is offline Matthew Saville
Wedding Photographer
Matthew Saville's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Bombadil View Post
I understand the notion that "if you have to ask . . . " (and have also seen it mentioned on various discussion threads). The problem with that line of thinking is that it is dismissive of the photographer who wants to learn about the differences and grow in their picture making (perhaps in a direction favored by the 800E). It pre-supposes a lot about the buyer. So, while I'm not criticizing you for using that phrase, I have to say that it is not relevant to my search...
I understand your reasoning behind that, however I think it still applies. Asking is better than NOT asking, of course, and obviously you'll get tons of good answers that will really enlighten any potential buyer. However, it is still a very risky purchase and the point is that "if you have to ask", ...there's a very good chance that the right answer IS INDEED to play it safe.

Of course there's a chance that even before you've read up on the subject, the D800E is in fact right for you. We're not trying to be dismissive, just pointing out that likelihood is in favor of the regular D800.

=Matt=
__________________
My first thought is always of light.” – Galen Rowell
My Personal PortfolioMy Latest Work
Moderator of the Dgrin Weddings Forum
Old Feb-26-2012, 07:33 AM
#76
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Saville View Post
I understand your reasoning behind that, however I think it still applies. Asking is better than NOT asking, of course, and obviously you'll get tons of good answers that will really enlighten any potential buyer. However, it is still a very risky purchase and the point is that "if you have to ask", ...there's a very good chance that the right answer IS INDEED to play it safe.

Of course there's a chance that even before you've read up on the subject, the D800E is in fact right for you. We're not trying to be dismissive, just pointing out that likelihood is in favor of the regular D800.

=Matt=
hmmm. But the likelihood of which is the better choice only helps you guys bet with each other on which camera will turn out to be the best for me. It doesn't help me know what I want. (Though I appreciate the good will and intentions inherent in what you are saying).

And actually, I'm not feeling that this is a risky decision. Either version will be a nice camera. Unless I buy both versions (which i won't do), whichever I acquire will not always be the perfect solution - so the game is to identify which is best for my (admittedly oddball) purposes. I'm not a 'play it safe' sort of buyer (at least not with hobby purchases where I have time to ponder the alternatives).
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Old Feb-26-2012, 08:12 AM
#77
Stuart-M is offline Stuart-M
Wedding Photographer
Stuart-M's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Bombadil View Post
Anybody considering purchasing either of these? Which way are you leaning?

I'm ready to buy a new camera. My primary interest is sports photography (for fun, not pro), but I can not rationalize the cost of a D4 (and would be a little conflicted about the size even if the cost were lower) - though I might rent one from time to time, so what I buy need not be the ultimate sports machine.

I think I need to move to full frame - in part because I need a bigger brighter viewfinder to mitigate failing eyesight (am I correct in thinking the 100% full frame 0.7x D800 viewfinder will be bigger and brighter than the DX (97%?) of D300/400?). In fact, I'm willing to give up frames per second for better viewfinder experience. I realize that I am giving up "reach" in the transition to FX (still wrestling with that. a TC would put upward pressure on my desired ISO capability and reduce viewfinder brightness).

My current camera is a D80, so there is no question that any new camera will be a step up. The aspects I would most like to improve are cleaner images at high ISO and more than 12 megapixels (with my 10MP D80 I have not been happy with anything above ISO 640. When renting D3 and D3s I was happy with ISO as high as 6400 - if I can get to 3200 with a new camera I will be happy).

I shoot almost exclusively in raw, not afraid to spend time on an image (could use some lessons, but that is a different issue). My computer is more than ready to handle increased file size. So no worries there.

So I think the question is whether to buy 800 or 800E. I'm leaning toward the 800E (pre-ordered it, in fact).

Are the potential problems with moire something only a studio pro can mitigate, or can a nerdy enthusiast learn to manage it?

I'm grateful to hear what others are thinking.
Firstly, you obviously want the D800e. Several people (far more qualified than I) have explained that the D700 is probably a better choice for sports photography, but lets be honest, you're not paying your rent and food bills with it. If you think the D800e is what you want, there's really no harm in it.
Old Feb-26-2012, 08:41 AM
#78
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuart-M View Post
Firstly, you obviously want the D800e. Several people (far more qualified than I) have explained that the D700 is probably a better choice for sports photography, but lets be honest, you're not paying your rent and food bills with it. If you think the D800e is what you want, there's really no harm in it.
"Firstly, you obviously want the D800e." I think so also, that is why I ordered one.

For a variety of reasons, I definitely want a D800 or a D800E rather than a D700 or some alternative. I'm completely on-board with the notion that there are many cameras better suited to sports photography. This thread was never intended as a question about that, and I have tried to be clear - I don't want advice about other camera models (as much as I _do_ appreciate the friendly impulses of DGrinners).

The issue is 800 or 800E. Here again, it may be true that most sports photographers, if forced to choose an 800 or 800E (even though they would prefer something else), would choose the 800. But what I want to understand is the why/when/how bad/how often trade-offs - because after all, I don't shoot sports exclusively, the sports I shoot are outdoors (with natural surroundings in a very rural setting).

What if I put the question this way: "800 or 800E for outdoor photography (not architecture but sometimes with people in it) and macro use?

I just want a deeper understanding than "800E for landscape and studio, 800 for all else".

I thought that mentioning my current camera and that I have used essentially all other models would indicate I can work with compromised solutions and know what other models can do. That should get us away from the "which model" question so we could have a discussion about AA filtered vs. non AA filtered - which is what interests me.
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Old Feb-26-2012, 10:52 AM
#79
ziggy53 is offline ziggy53
Still learnin'still lovin
ziggy53's Avatar
Some additional non-AA information:

High contrast boundaries of "any" object may show visible "aliasing or "stairstepping", exaggerated by sharpening.

This effect is especially noticeable on power and phone lines in the scene.

While I haven't seen it mentioned, I suspect that if you use Live View, available on many digital cameras, you may be able to see the moiré and aliasing issues as they occur. It may be possible to "de-focus" ever-so-slightly to diminish the problem.

Tilting the camera can also change the nature of the aliasing problems, in some cases eliminating the problem altogether.
__________________
ziggy53
Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
Old Feb-26-2012, 12:30 PM
#80
T. Bombadil is offline T. Bombadil OP
Major grins
T. Bombadil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggy53 View Post
While I haven't seen it mentioned, I suspect that if you use Live View, available on many digital cameras, you may be able to see the moiré and aliasing issues as they occur. It may be possible to "de-focus" ever-so-slightly to diminish the problem.
{second attempt at a reply. servers are fidgety.}

Do you think it would be necessary to "zoom in" on the lcd to discern this?

Thom Hogan (I think it was Thom) said that assigning a function button to "full lcd zoom" would be useful for checking for moire. The number of pixels involved makes perusing the whole image at 100% too tedious - but most of my shots where moire is a risk involve a person surrounded by less crisply focused stuff (other people, and nature) so that would be a workable way to identify moire.
__________________
Bruce

Chooka chooka hoo la ley
Looka looka koo la ley
Page 4  of  5
1 2 3 4 5
Tell The World!  
Similar Threads Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
D800 on Nikon USA website DsrtVW Cameras 27 Jul-27-2012 03:06 AM
Nikon D800 36mp $4,000 rumor jpc Cameras 172 Jul-14-2012 02:33 AM
Nikon D700 cape cod Cameras 64 Sep-19-2011 11:10 PM
D7000 announcement. Is it finally time to upgrade my D200? greenpea Cameras 35 Sep-24-2010 05:26 AM


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump